Constructed a T.P. Roll Wreath (320/366)

“It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas”
Meredith Willson

 

I love the Holidays.  I love Thanksgiving dinner, gatherings of loved ones, mulled wine or cider, and just the general feeling of cheer and warmth for others that people have (well except for maybe when one’s anywhere near a mall – ha!).

Along with that, I love Christmas decorations.  Since we don’t get snow (for the most part) here, it’s really the decorations coming out that start the feeling of the Holidays for me.  I know there are people who are adamant about not looking at Christmas until Thanksgiving is over, but I don’t think there’s anything wrong with a few strings of lights, and maybe a wreath or two, in November.

Well, a while back I saw an idea for a clock with a design around it made out of T.P. rolls, and I thought that was a cool idea, so I started saving rolls – but tonight I just felt like I wanted to start my Holiday decorating, and thought I’d make a wreath instead.

I found this project on SeeYouThereDesign.com, and got to work.  Thanks, Jaime!

You start out with normal, everyday T.P. rolls.  Thank goodness I was finally getting to use these up.  I’ve been saving them for a long time, and they were taking up space!

You start off by flattening the rolls – I didn’t worry too much about creasing them – when you cut them it defines each crease a bit more.

The sites I saw that had wreath making instructions suggested you measure, mark, and cut your rolls so they’re all uniform; but since I had only T.P. rolls, I figured they were all pretty much the same size, so I just eyeballed the middle of each roll and cut there, and then cut each half in half again to get about one-inch width pieces.

After I had a bunch of “roll leaves”, I used a bowl as the base for the center of my wreath and lined my roll leaves around them.

Then came the toughest part – glueing the first ring of leaves together.  It just takes a bit of a sure hand and/or the ability to not freak out if you mess up a little bit.  I tried to note where the leaves touched each other and put a line of glue on each leaf where the next one should touch, and then pressed the leaves together.  I did this all the way around, leaf by leaf.

After the first ring was done, I appreciated my handiwork.

Pretty cool.  This would make a cute sun or lion decoration if you needed to make one of those!  But I was making a wreath, so I needed a second ring.  With this ring, I didn’t put the leaves in the spaces between the first ring, but instead tried to do “double-leaf” connections.  This ended up reminding me of laurels – good stuff if you wanted to make decorations for the Olympics!

Next, I put a third ring, and these leaves were a bit more fill-in – they almost made “tri-leaf” patterns, but I tried not to push the new leaves too far into the wreath – this is where it’s important that it’s not exactly uniform – real wreaths (or leaf patterns) aren’t, so this one shouldn’t be, either.

Yay!  This was starting to look like a wreath to me.  I put a few more accent leaves at a few spots around the wreath, again to break up the uniformity.  They were pretty much evenly spaced, but I wanted them to point a different direction from the ring before and stick out a bit from the other leaves.  And voila!

I had a few leaves left over, so I cut them in half again to make them thinner, and made simple stars by glueing six together.  Pretty!

I strung these on some thread, and hung my new, recycled project on our door.  It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas!

P.S. In case you were wondering, yes that’s an “Oceanic Airlines” bumper sticker from the show “LOST” on our door.  We had an epic party for the finale and are having a hard time giving up the “Hatch” door that we made for it.  Ha ha ha!

Related Links:
DIY – Toilet Paper Roll Wreath – SeeYouThereDesign.com

 

Comments
One Response to “Constructed a T.P. Roll Wreath (320/366)”
  1. Ying says:

    Beautiful! Maybe you can sell these on Etsy.

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